Dull, boring things


One of the best aspects of my new, first-floor apartment is that it is on the first floor, but even now I have to plan my trips for groceries or dining due to the at least 6-block walk to anything. In one direction six blocks, I have a Tesco, what amounts to a small 7-11 in the States. There’s a 7-11 right next to it. Go figure.

Or, I can go about 10 blocks toward town until I get to Soi 51, where there are a number of Thai food restaurants (and also a sushi place I may have to check out), and a 7-11. ATMs are located in both directions.

I had a couple of goals today so I mapped out my route to go to the main highway where the Tesco is located, but turned to go to a copy shop to get prints of documents I will need next week for my visa extension. I also wanted to print up new business cards, but for the second time the files were not saved correctly. The shop has a young Chinese-looking guy who speaks some English; it’s just a little shop and they probably welcome any business they can get.

A few blocks after that shop is Soi 51, that has maybe 10 restaurants, Thai and Western, and where I’ve eaten a few times. There is one place that grills pork, chicken and fish that I’ve tried a couple of times and is usually busy (a good sign), and also seems to specialize in papaya salads. The last papaya salad I tasted here was too spicy for me to eat but I was assured they could make them non-spicy.

There’s a mom-and-pop restaurant nearby serving more basic Thai foods – noodles, rice, boiled chicken and pork. They also tout their chicken noodle soup and that was my goal today. The cook is an older women and I’m sure the co-owner. A young guy, maybe her grandson, assists, along with a couple of others, probably family.

But she had not yet prepared the chicken noodle soup. So I ordered an alternative – chicken and rice. Mostly rice.

There are three other Thai-style restaurants next door that deserve some attention.

A stop at the 7-11 and the 10-block walk back. Daily exercise and errands and lunch taken care of.

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Restaurant relief on the horizon

On my return from the beach this evening (I go to the beach pretty much every early evening, and sometimes later), I noticed three middle-aged women at a new sign on a building facing the alley leading to the beach. The sign said it was a restaurant/cafe. So I wandered over and briefly chatted with three delightful ladies who are, in fact, opening a Thai restaurant next week. Only a block away. I asked if there would be tourist prices or Thai prices and they admonished me for suggesting. If the food’s any good, they will have me as a regular customer as I will eat local far more often if I don’t have to walk six blocks. Don’t you think?

About 2bagsandapack

Lifetime journalist, author, magazine editor and publisher, now semi-retired and traveling the world. My plan, after living in Costa Rica for 14 months, was to visit a new country in southern Europe every three months to experience the culture and the challenge of adapting to a new environment, while on a fixed income. That plan was sidetracked when I was offered a job in Indonesia, providing an opportunity to explore Asia. Indonesia lasted for a 4 wonderful years but I have now moved on to Hua Hin, Thailand.
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